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Conference programme 

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Poster session

Lead Session Chair:
Stephan Barth, Managing Director, ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research, Germany
Poul Hummelshøj DTU Wind Energy, Denmark
Co-authors:
Poul Hummelshøj (1) F P Peter Hjuler Jensen (1)
(1) DTU Wind Energy, Roskilde, Denmark

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Poster
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Presenter's biography

Biographies are supplied directly by presenters at OFFSHORE 2015 and are published here unedited


Abstract

Østerild national test centre for large wind turbines

Introduction

In June 2010 the Danish Government passed a law in order to establish a National Test Centre for Large Wind Turbines at Østerild, where new wind turbine prototypes could be tested. The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) was appointed to be head of the establishment and operation of the new wind turbine prototype test facility.

Approach

Thus, the Test Centre was established for the State of Denmark by DTU together with Vestas Wind Systems A/S (Vestas) and Siemens Wind Power A/S (Siemens). The centre consists of seven test stands located north-south with a distance of 600 metres. It is designed to test wind turbines for the future – each of them up to 16 MW, 250 metres tip height, and a rotor diameter of up to 220 metres. All costs related to the establishment of National Test Centre at Østerild are fully paid by the industry.

Main body of abstract

Four test stands are owned by Vestas and Siemens and three test stands are owned by DTU and presently rented to the Global Wind Industry through an open tender. The three test stands are now rented to Envision Energy, EDF Energies Nouvelles and Vestas Wind Systems A/S. The test facility was inaugurated in October 2012 and four wind turbines are or have been tested until now. The expectation is that the last there wind turbines will be erected in 2015.

The Test Centre's geographical location and facilities allow for the wind turbine industry in collaboration with DTU and other research institutions to carry out research, development and tests of prototype wind turbines and new wind turbine technology.


Conclusion

The National Test Centre for Large Wind Turbines at Østerild is located in an area with very good wind and turbulence conditions for testing very large offshore wind turbines. In average it is possible to perform 12 power curve measurements (according to IEC) per year if the wind conditions alone determined the capacity to measure power curves.