Back to the programme printer.gif Print




Delegates are invited to meet and discuss with the poster presenters in this topic directly after the session 'Remote sensing: From toys to tools?' taking place on Wednesday, 12 March 2014 at 14:15-15:45. The meet-the-authors will take place in the poster area.

Alexander Cassola Oldbaum Services Ltd., United Kingdom
Co-authors:

(1) Oldbaum Services Ltd., Stirling, United Kingdom (2) Frazer-Nash Consultancy, Glasgow, United Kingdom (3) University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom (4) The Carbon Trust, London, United Kingdom

Printer friendly version: printer.gif Print

Abstract

Sensitivity of space and time on scanning lidar data correlation and the implications on synchronisation of bi-static systems

Introduction

When possible, running a cross comparison between two or more instruments that are out on the field is an important check for accuracy, consistency and reliability of the instruments in question. Now that scanning LiDARs are becoming more known in the wind industry, cross checking data from several such systems is a very useful tool while they are gathering data on the field.

Approach

Wind data that was collected by two scanning Doppler LiDARs from within an offshore windfarm in Denmark during a wind measurement campaign was processed such that a quality check was performed on it. Statistical and qualitative anlysis were done that gave good indications of the output performance of the LiDARs.

Main body of abstract

When possible, running a cross comparison between two or more instruments that are out on the field is an important check for accuracy, consistency and reliability of the instruments in question. As part of the Carbon Trust OWA Offshore wakes campaign, two scanning LiDAR systems were deployed to give near full coverage of the host offshore wind farm. As part of the programme, periodic checks were performed to give confidence on how each system was performing, and that system output remained consistent. The LiDARs were several kilometres apart and the scan patterns were not synchronised temporally or spatially. It was, however, possible to pick out data points from the two LiDAR data sets that could be used for such a cross comparison based on their spatial and temporal separation. The line of sight velocities were compared for certain beam angle scenarios. The process and results of the correlations and their sensitivity are presented, with implications as to the required accuracy when looking to implement bi-static systems, using more than one system to scan the same volume of space.

Conclusion

The work carried out towards producing the results for the cross correlation of data from two scanning Doppler LiDARs shows that this is an important check that should be implemented when two or more bi-static scanning LiDAR systems measure wind data simultaneously in the same volume of space. It also shows that even though it is possible to do so when such systems do not run synchronised scan patterns, synchronising the systems would facilitate the process.


Learning objectives
This work shows that it is possible to run quality checks on scanning LiDAR data in a LiDAR versus LiDAR fashion when there is more than one system making measurements.