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Delegates are invited to meet and discuss with the poster presenters in this topic directly after the session 'The model chain: First steps towards tomorrow's technology' taking place on Thursday, 13 March 2014 at 09:00-10:30. The meet-the-authors will take place in the poster area.

Jens Carsten Hansen Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
Co-authors:
Jens Carsten Hansen (1) F P Niels Gylling Mortensen (1) Jake Badger (1) Eugene Mabille (2) Yvette Spamer (2)
(1) Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde, Denmark (2) Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Stellenbosch, South Africa (3) Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Stellenbosch, South Africa

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Presenter's biography

Biographies are supplied directly by presenters at EWEA 2014 and are published here unedited

Niels G. Mortensen works as a senior researcher at the Department of Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Niels has been a member of the WAsP development team since 1987 and thus jointly responsible for developing, maintaining and supporting the various WAsP program packages for more than 25 years.
Niels acted as editor of the European Wind Atlas (1989) and has further participated in the development of wind atlases for Denmark, Finland, Egypt, Cape Verde, India, and North East China. He currently works on the Wind Atlas for South Africa project.

Abstract

Large-scale, high-resolution wind resource mapping applied for wind farm planning and development in South Africa

Introduction

The Wind Atlas for South Africa (WASA) is a 4-year project with the objective to develop and employ numerical wind atlas methods and develop capacity to enable planning of large-scale exploitation of wind power in South Africa. The first verified numerical wind atlas and database (presented elsewhere in this conference) have been employed for large-scale, high-resolution wind resource mapping, for national and provincial planning and strategic environmental assessments for wind power in South Africa.

Approach

The first verified numerical wind atlas is based on a statistical-dynamical downscaling method (KAMM/WAsP) and has provided wind atlas data sets at 5 km horizontal spacing in the Wind Atlas for South Africa domain. These wind atlas data sets are used together with elevation and land cover maps to model the wind resource of a 350,000 square kilometre area with a distance of 250 meters between calculation points. In this presentation we describe the techniques used and compare the results to the wind climates observed at ten reference stations throughout the domain.

Main body of abstract

The Wind Atlas for South Africa (WASA) project has provided verified numerical wind atlases for the entire WASA domain: Western Cape and parts of Eastern and Northern Cape provinces. The generalised wind climatologies at each model node consist of wind roses and wind speed distributions for a number of standard land cover types and heights above ground level. The first verified numerical wind atlas was obtained by downscaling 30 years of NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data using the Karlsruhe Atmospheric Mesoscale Model.
This verified numerical wind atlas has been used for mapping the wind resources of the entire WASA domain (350,000 square km) in great detail (250 m) using the WAsP software. The topographical data used for this high-resolution modelling are 20-m digital height contours from 1:50,000 South African topographical maps and land cover information from the USGS Global Land Cover Characteristics database (GLCC). The outputs of the modelling are 250-m grids of long-term mean wind speed and mean power density, terrain surface elevation and terrain complexity (RIX index).
This new database of high-resolution wind resource data has been employed by the Department of Environmental Affairs and Development Planning, Provincial Government of the Western Cape, and by the Department of Environmental Affairs of South Africa for GIS-based strategic environmental assessments (SEA) for Western Cape Province and for the WASA domain.
The presentation will describe how this novel and comprehensive wind resource data base has been obtained and show examples of its use for wind farm planning and development in South Africa.


Conclusion

The wind resources over a large region in South Africa have been modelled with a very high resolution using the WAsP microscale model – a fairly rare example of the very last step of the model chain: down to the microscale over large areas. We will briefly describe the model setup that has made this approach possible and the validation of the results at ten high-quality masts in the domain. Finally, we will present the wind resource maps and point to some applications.
All data and results of the Wind Atlas for South Africa project are in public domain.


Learning objectives
Audience will: i) get insight into the model requirements (software and hardware) needed for doing large-scale, high-resolution wind resource mapping, ii) see and have presented the new detailed wind resource maps for the WASA domain in South Africa, and iii) learn about a few applications – and future perspectives – of this new technology and database of wind resources.