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Delegates are invited to meet and discuss with the poster presenters in this topic directly after the session 'Materials: Challenges and potentials' taking place on Thursday, 13 March 2014 at 09:00-10:30. The meet-the-authors will take place in the poster area.

Georg Greiner HAINZL Industriesysteme GmbH, Austria
Co-authors:
Dieter Kocevar (1) F P
(1) HAINZL Industriesysteme GmbH, Linz, Austria

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Abstract

Detection of ice formation on rotor blades unsing RFID technology

Introduction

Ice formation on the rotor blades of turbines is a recurring topic, and one which every manufacturer, project developer and operator must tackle. During the past 10 years various procedures and systems have been developed to detect ice formation, all of which have their particular advantages and disadvantages, and no system has yet been established as a "patented solution". Hainzl is developing an innovative system based on RFID technology. The system consists of readers mounted on the tower in combination with RFID tags on the rotor blades. RFID technology has been used for many decades in industry and logistics.

Approach

Hainzl is developing an innovative system based on RFID technology. The ice detection system consists of readers mounted on the tower in combination with RFID tags on the rotor blades. These RFID tags are read by the reader when the blade moves past (minimal spin is sufficient). The system can be used on new turbines and can be retrofitted to existing plants.

Main body of abstract

The ice detection system is specially designed for use on wind turbines. In order to connect to SCADA systems developed by different wind turbine manufacturers, it has various interfaces for reporting ice formations.
The system consists of readers mounted on the tower in combination with Radio frequency identification (RFID) tags on the rotor blades. These RFID tags are read by the reader when the blade moves past. RFID allows the operator to identify the thickness of ice on wind turbine rotor blades. RFID technology has been used for many decades in industry and logistics. It features small, passive (i.e. battery-less) RFID transponders which are read at several meters' distance using UHF radio waves. If the transponders are covered by a layer of ice, the waves are greatly attenuated. This attenuation increases in proportion to thickness of the ice. By evaluating the received field strength it is possible to establish in real time the ice conditions on the rotor blade.


Conclusion

Multiple comparisons with other procedures have demonstrated the reliability of the Hainzl ice detection system. Gains were also made in terms of detects accuracy and response time. Advantages of the new systems are:
- Reliable ice detection over the entire speed range
- Even small ice formations are detected
- Ice can also be detected on the side facing away from the gondola
- Rapid response time
- Easy to retrofit to existing plants
- Simple connection to existing control systems



Learning objectives
Contrary to the previously used ice identification systems, like analyses of the atmospheric (risk of ice), of the performance data, of the vibration or the optical systems (laser) the Hainzl ice detection system is the first on which can be relied for sure.